Library
Articles
Employee Feedback

How Employees Can Give Feedback to Their Boss

November 8, 2017

When we think about giving feedback in the workplace, we tend to think about bosses letting their subordinates know how they’re doing, work-wise.

But employees spend just as much time with their bosses, which puts them in a good position to critique their managers’ performances and serve feedback in the other direction. Employees also have the most knowledge about which policies and procedures are or aren’t working. It even has a name: Feedback employees give to their bosses is called upward feedback. Unfortunately, many workers are scared to offer constructive feedback to their superiors because they think that by doing so they’ll fall out of their boss’s good graces.

But when organizational culture encourages employees to give upward feedback, companies benefit in a number of ways:

  • Employee morale shoots up. Teams never have to wonder about whether their bosses care about their ideas and suggestions, and might even get to see their ideas put into practice. Over time, work becomes more enjoyable because employees have more say and therefore feel more engaged.
  • Managers become more engaged, too. Nearly two-thirds of employees want more feedback. That’s because they can leverage it to become more effective in their roles. Managers are employees, too, and the best ones are always trying to improve—just like the star employees that work for them. Receiving feedback regularly helps managers understand what they need to do to become better leaders.
  • Profitability increases as well. According to a Gallup survey, managers who receive feedback lead teams that are 8.9% more profitable than those who do not. This makes sense: When bosses know where changes need to be made and follow through on those suggestions, teams become happier and more productive—which translates into more sales.

Despite these benefits, it can still be difficult to get employees to buy in to the idea that they need to tell their bosses what they’re doing wrong. In order to build the best company, organizations need to create cultures that encourage employees to give their bosses feedback—no matter how uncomfortable that might be for feedback-averse managers or more introverted employees. Otherwise, bosses will remain stuck in their less-than-optimal ways and discouraging policies will remain in place, disengaging employees.

But there are several tactics both organizations and employees can employ to increase the chances they unlock the full promise of upward feedback:

  • Managers should be ready to hear it. First thing’s first: If managers want employees to give upward feedback regularly, they need to let their teams know, very clearly, that they want to hear it -- and mean it too. Even if it might make them uncomfortable, managers have to be receptive to feedback. Managers should also acknowledge that they understand employees might feel awkward critiquing their superiors.
  • Find a tool that makes feedback easy. To streamline the upward feedback process—and ensure honest feedback is given—use a modern performance management platform that makes it easier for your employees to deliver feedback anonymously.
  • Suggest employees prepare remarks ahead of time. Prior to relaying feedback during a 1:1 meeting, employees should do their due diligence to make sure that they know exactly what they want to say.
  • Let employees know that it’s their perspective that matters. It’s impossible for an employee to truly understand the scope of their boss’ job. According to the Harvard Business Review, employees should give feedback that’s based on their own observations. Encourage the use of data to support their point of view.
  • Encourage suggestions, solutions, and guidance. As with employee feedback, suggesting a solution or goal to work towards is a great boon for upward feedback. For example, if your boss is always leaving early while the rest of the team stays late, suggest they redistribute some work so everyone’s load is lighter—allowing folks to leave earlier. Once again, data can strengthen the employee's case; in this example, let the manager know that research says more than half of U.S. workers are burned out.

The sooner companies understand that feedback can be a two-way street and incorporate upward feedback into their ongoing operations, the better off they’ll be. Engagement will increase for both managers and employees. In turn, workers will be happier—and that happiness will translate into a healthier bottom line.

Library
Articles
Employee Feedback

How Employees Can Give Feedback to Their Boss

When we think about giving feedback in the workplace, we tend to think about bosses letting their subordinates know how they’re doing. Learn the employee role.

When we think about giving feedback in the workplace, we tend to think about bosses letting their subordinates know how they’re doing, work-wise.

But employees spend just as much time with their bosses, which puts them in a good position to critique their managers’ performances and serve feedback in the other direction. Employees also have the most knowledge about which policies and procedures are or aren’t working. It even has a name: Feedback employees give to their bosses is called upward feedback. Unfortunately, many workers are scared to offer constructive feedback to their superiors because they think that by doing so they’ll fall out of their boss’s good graces.

But when organizational culture encourages employees to give upward feedback, companies benefit in a number of ways:

  • Employee morale shoots up. Teams never have to wonder about whether their bosses care about their ideas and suggestions, and might even get to see their ideas put into practice. Over time, work becomes more enjoyable because employees have more say and therefore feel more engaged.
  • Managers become more engaged, too. Nearly two-thirds of employees want more feedback. That’s because they can leverage it to become more effective in their roles. Managers are employees, too, and the best ones are always trying to improve—just like the star employees that work for them. Receiving feedback regularly helps managers understand what they need to do to become better leaders.
  • Profitability increases as well. According to a Gallup survey, managers who receive feedback lead teams that are 8.9% more profitable than those who do not. This makes sense: When bosses know where changes need to be made and follow through on those suggestions, teams become happier and more productive—which translates into more sales.

Despite these benefits, it can still be difficult to get employees to buy in to the idea that they need to tell their bosses what they’re doing wrong. In order to build the best company, organizations need to create cultures that encourage employees to give their bosses feedback—no matter how uncomfortable that might be for feedback-averse managers or more introverted employees. Otherwise, bosses will remain stuck in their less-than-optimal ways and discouraging policies will remain in place, disengaging employees.

But there are several tactics both organizations and employees can employ to increase the chances they unlock the full promise of upward feedback:

  • Managers should be ready to hear it. First thing’s first: If managers want employees to give upward feedback regularly, they need to let their teams know, very clearly, that they want to hear it -- and mean it too. Even if it might make them uncomfortable, managers have to be receptive to feedback. Managers should also acknowledge that they understand employees might feel awkward critiquing their superiors.
  • Find a tool that makes feedback easy. To streamline the upward feedback process—and ensure honest feedback is given—use a modern performance management platform that makes it easier for your employees to deliver feedback anonymously.
  • Suggest employees prepare remarks ahead of time. Prior to relaying feedback during a 1:1 meeting, employees should do their due diligence to make sure that they know exactly what they want to say.
  • Let employees know that it’s their perspective that matters. It’s impossible for an employee to truly understand the scope of their boss’ job. According to the Harvard Business Review, employees should give feedback that’s based on their own observations. Encourage the use of data to support their point of view.
  • Encourage suggestions, solutions, and guidance. As with employee feedback, suggesting a solution or goal to work towards is a great boon for upward feedback. For example, if your boss is always leaving early while the rest of the team stays late, suggest they redistribute some work so everyone’s load is lighter—allowing folks to leave earlier. Once again, data can strengthen the employee's case; in this example, let the manager know that research says more than half of U.S. workers are burned out.

The sooner companies understand that feedback can be a two-way street and incorporate upward feedback into their ongoing operations, the better off they’ll be. Engagement will increase for both managers and employees. In turn, workers will be happier—and that happiness will translate into a healthier bottom line.

Partner

Download '':

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Library
Articles
Employee Feedback

How Employees Can Give Feedback to Their Boss

When we think about giving feedback in the workplace, we tend to think about bosses letting their subordinates know how they’re doing. Learn the employee role.

RSVP to watch live or get the recording

You're all set!
Check your email for a link to the webinar
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Library
Articles
Employee Feedback

How Employees Can Give Feedback to Their Boss

Prefer Podcasts? You can listen on iTunes, or here:

When we think about giving feedback in the workplace, we tend to think about bosses letting their subordinates know how they’re doing, work-wise.

But employees spend just as much time with their bosses, which puts them in a good position to critique their managers’ performances and serve feedback in the other direction. Employees also have the most knowledge about which policies and procedures are or aren’t working. It even has a name: Feedback employees give to their bosses is called upward feedback. Unfortunately, many workers are scared to offer constructive feedback to their superiors because they think that by doing so they’ll fall out of their boss’s good graces.

But when organizational culture encourages employees to give upward feedback, companies benefit in a number of ways:

  • Employee morale shoots up. Teams never have to wonder about whether their bosses care about their ideas and suggestions, and might even get to see their ideas put into practice. Over time, work becomes more enjoyable because employees have more say and therefore feel more engaged.
  • Managers become more engaged, too. Nearly two-thirds of employees want more feedback. That’s because they can leverage it to become more effective in their roles. Managers are employees, too, and the best ones are always trying to improve—just like the star employees that work for them. Receiving feedback regularly helps managers understand what they need to do to become better leaders.
  • Profitability increases as well. According to a Gallup survey, managers who receive feedback lead teams that are 8.9% more profitable than those who do not. This makes sense: When bosses know where changes need to be made and follow through on those suggestions, teams become happier and more productive—which translates into more sales.

Despite these benefits, it can still be difficult to get employees to buy in to the idea that they need to tell their bosses what they’re doing wrong. In order to build the best company, organizations need to create cultures that encourage employees to give their bosses feedback—no matter how uncomfortable that might be for feedback-averse managers or more introverted employees. Otherwise, bosses will remain stuck in their less-than-optimal ways and discouraging policies will remain in place, disengaging employees.

But there are several tactics both organizations and employees can employ to increase the chances they unlock the full promise of upward feedback:

  • Managers should be ready to hear it. First thing’s first: If managers want employees to give upward feedback regularly, they need to let their teams know, very clearly, that they want to hear it -- and mean it too. Even if it might make them uncomfortable, managers have to be receptive to feedback. Managers should also acknowledge that they understand employees might feel awkward critiquing their superiors.
  • Find a tool that makes feedback easy. To streamline the upward feedback process—and ensure honest feedback is given—use a modern performance management platform that makes it easier for your employees to deliver feedback anonymously.
  • Suggest employees prepare remarks ahead of time. Prior to relaying feedback during a 1:1 meeting, employees should do their due diligence to make sure that they know exactly what they want to say.
  • Let employees know that it’s their perspective that matters. It’s impossible for an employee to truly understand the scope of their boss’ job. According to the Harvard Business Review, employees should give feedback that’s based on their own observations. Encourage the use of data to support their point of view.
  • Encourage suggestions, solutions, and guidance. As with employee feedback, suggesting a solution or goal to work towards is a great boon for upward feedback. For example, if your boss is always leaving early while the rest of the team stays late, suggest they redistribute some work so everyone’s load is lighter—allowing folks to leave earlier. Once again, data can strengthen the employee's case; in this example, let the manager know that research says more than half of U.S. workers are burned out.

The sooner companies understand that feedback can be a two-way street and incorporate upward feedback into their ongoing operations, the better off they’ll be. Engagement will increase for both managers and employees. In turn, workers will be happier—and that happiness will translate into a healthier bottom line.

Library
Articles
Employee Feedback

How Employees Can Give Feedback to Their Boss

Prefer Podcasts? You can listen on iTunes, or here:

Enjoy the presentation? Download the deck

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

When we think about giving feedback in the workplace, we tend to think about bosses letting their subordinates know how they’re doing, work-wise.

But employees spend just as much time with their bosses, which puts them in a good position to critique their managers’ performances and serve feedback in the other direction. Employees also have the most knowledge about which policies and procedures are or aren’t working. It even has a name: Feedback employees give to their bosses is called upward feedback. Unfortunately, many workers are scared to offer constructive feedback to their superiors because they think that by doing so they’ll fall out of their boss’s good graces.

But when organizational culture encourages employees to give upward feedback, companies benefit in a number of ways:

  • Employee morale shoots up. Teams never have to wonder about whether their bosses care about their ideas and suggestions, and might even get to see their ideas put into practice. Over time, work becomes more enjoyable because employees have more say and therefore feel more engaged.
  • Managers become more engaged, too. Nearly two-thirds of employees want more feedback. That’s because they can leverage it to become more effective in their roles. Managers are employees, too, and the best ones are always trying to improve—just like the star employees that work for them. Receiving feedback regularly helps managers understand what they need to do to become better leaders.
  • Profitability increases as well. According to a Gallup survey, managers who receive feedback lead teams that are 8.9% more profitable than those who do not. This makes sense: When bosses know where changes need to be made and follow through on those suggestions, teams become happier and more productive—which translates into more sales.

Despite these benefits, it can still be difficult to get employees to buy in to the idea that they need to tell their bosses what they’re doing wrong. In order to build the best company, organizations need to create cultures that encourage employees to give their bosses feedback—no matter how uncomfortable that might be for feedback-averse managers or more introverted employees. Otherwise, bosses will remain stuck in their less-than-optimal ways and discouraging policies will remain in place, disengaging employees.

But there are several tactics both organizations and employees can employ to increase the chances they unlock the full promise of upward feedback:

  • Managers should be ready to hear it. First thing’s first: If managers want employees to give upward feedback regularly, they need to let their teams know, very clearly, that they want to hear it -- and mean it too. Even if it might make them uncomfortable, managers have to be receptive to feedback. Managers should also acknowledge that they understand employees might feel awkward critiquing their superiors.
  • Find a tool that makes feedback easy. To streamline the upward feedback process—and ensure honest feedback is given—use a modern performance management platform that makes it easier for your employees to deliver feedback anonymously.
  • Suggest employees prepare remarks ahead of time. Prior to relaying feedback during a 1:1 meeting, employees should do their due diligence to make sure that they know exactly what they want to say.
  • Let employees know that it’s their perspective that matters. It’s impossible for an employee to truly understand the scope of their boss’ job. According to the Harvard Business Review, employees should give feedback that’s based on their own observations. Encourage the use of data to support their point of view.
  • Encourage suggestions, solutions, and guidance. As with employee feedback, suggesting a solution or goal to work towards is a great boon for upward feedback. For example, if your boss is always leaving early while the rest of the team stays late, suggest they redistribute some work so everyone’s load is lighter—allowing folks to leave earlier. Once again, data can strengthen the employee's case; in this example, let the manager know that research says more than half of U.S. workers are burned out.

The sooner companies understand that feedback can be a two-way street and incorporate upward feedback into their ongoing operations, the better off they’ll be. Engagement will increase for both managers and employees. In turn, workers will be happier—and that happiness will translate into a healthier bottom line.